News Archive

October 20th, 2016

ISE Welcomes Azadeh Sheidaei on Oct. 28th, 2016

Multiscale Modeling and Characterization of Polymer Nanoreinforced Composites

Seminar by Azadeh Sheidaei, Assistant Professor

Mechanical Engineering, Kettering University

asheidaei@kettering.edu; (517) 898-5191

Friday, October 28th, 2016; 3:15-4:15 pm

210E Baker Systems; 1971 Neil Avenue

In recent years, polymer nano-composites (PNCs) have increasingly gained more attention due to their improved mechanical, barrier, thermal, optical, electrical and biodegradable properties in comparison with the conventional micro-composites or pristine polymers. With a modest addition of nanoparticles (usually less than 5wt. %), PNCs offer a wide range of improvements in moduli, strength, heat resistance, biodegradability, as well as decrease in gas permeability and flammability. Although PNCs offer enormous opportunities to design novel material systems, development of an effective numerical modeling approach to predict their properties based on their complex multi-phase and multiscale structure is still at an early stage. In this talk, I will present my research on Multiscale Modeling and Characterization of Polymer Nanoreinforced Composites. I have developed a microstructure inspired material model based on a statistical technique. I have utilized this method to reconstruct the microstructure of Halloysite nanotube (HNT) polypropylene composite, exfoliated Graphene nanoplatelet (xGnP) polymer composite, Fuel cell and Rock. This model was able to successfully predict the mechanical properties of nanocomposites, petrophysical properties such as porosity, permeability, electrical conductivity and mechanical of Rock and thermal and mechanical properties of Fuel cells. This 3D microstructure model was later incorporated in a damage modeling problem in nanocomposite where damage initiation and damage progression have been modeled using cohesive-zone and modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) material models. There is a significant difference between the properties of inclusion and the host polymer in polymer nanocomposite, which leads to the damage evolution during deformation due to a huge stress concentration between nanofiller and polymer. The finite element model of progressive debonding in nano-reinforced composite has been proposed based on the cohesive-zone model of the interface. In order to model cohesive-zone, a cohesive zone traction displacement relation is needed. This curve may be obtained either through a fiber pullout experiment or by simulating the test using molecular dynamics. In the case of nano-fillers, conducting fiber pullout test is very difficult and result is often not reproducible. Using our newly developed framework based on molecular dynamics simulation, fiber-matrix pullout test has been conducted in order to obtain traction-displacement curve for cohesive zone model. This damage model was implemented in our 3D model to predict the material response more accurately.

Azadeh Sheidaei received her BSc in Aerospace Engineering from Sharif University of Technology and MSc and PhD degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Michigan State University. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Kettering University in Michigan. Sheidaei’s main research area is “multiscale characterization and computational modeling of advanced material systems such as polymer reinforced composites”. During her graduate study at MSU (2009-2015), she worked at Composite Vehicle Research Center (CVRC) where she worked on numerous research and industrial projects. Those span over the areas of structural integrity of composites, development of constitutive models and computational tools to predict the mechanical behavior of novel materials such as nanocomposites, computational modeling of soft tissue and power sources such as lithium-ion battery and fuel cells. She has published 11 ISI journal articles and 12 technical conference paper which have been cited over 185 times. Sheidaei is a member of the American Society of Composite (ASC), Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and Society of Women Engineers (SWE). Sheidaei has received several research and educational grants from NSF, CAAT (Center for Advanced Automotive Technology) and KEEN (The Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network) within the last year. Sheidaei is a recipient of the Zonta International Amelia Earhart Fellowship, which is presented to women pursuing a doctoral degree who demonstrate a superior academic record in the field of aerospace-related sciences and engineering. She has also received dissertation competition award while being selected as the outstanding graduate student by the ME Department at Michigan State University.

October 11th, 2016

ISE Welcomes Dr. Jorge Valenzuela on Oct. 19th, 2016

Generating Cheaper and Cleaner Electricity with Flexible Transmission Networks

Seminar by Dr. Jorge Valenzuela

Philpott-WestPoint Stevens Professor and Chair

Industrial and Systems Engineering, Auburn University

Wednesday, October 19, 2016 from 4:00 – 5:00 pm

395 Watts Hall; 2041 College Rd. N.

The generation of electric power presents several challenges. It cannot be conveniently stored. Thus, there should be sufficient production at all times to meet the immediate demand. It uses a mix of energy sources such as nuclear, hydro, coal, oil, gas, wind, solar, and biomass which are usually located at different locations. These sources produce different amounts of emissions and require different investment and operational costs. Both supply and demand are time-dependent and uncertain. The transmission network used to distribute the power to consumption nodes has been usually considered a static structure when economically dispatching power generators. However, multiple studies have reported noticeable savings in power generation costs when dynamically switching transmission lines into/out of service or using dynamic thermal ratings for the transmission lines. In this presentation, I will describe a large-scale mixed integer programming model where the transmission switching and thermal ratings occur at the beginning of a time period (season) and remains unchanged during that period. The objective of the optimization model is to minimize the total energy generation cost over a season subject to loads and N-1 reliability requirements. A decomposition approach is used to solve the optimization problem efficiently. The model is tested on the 14-bus, 39-bus, and 118-bus power systems showing potential cost savings and lower emissions in each case.

Jorge Valenzuela is the Philpott-WestPoint Stevens Professor in the Industrial and Systems Engineering at Auburn University. He holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, a M.S. in Mathematics and Statistics, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering. He was department chair of the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department during the period 2011-16. He has received the William Walker Superior Teaching Award and the Outstanding Junior Faculty Research Award from the College of Engineering and twice the Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award. Dr. Valenzuela teaches courses in operations research and statistics. His research interests lie in the field of energy modeling, optimization and analysis. His research has been funded by the Argonne National Laboratory, National Science Foundation, and USDA Forest Service. He has over 50 scientific publications. One of his papers received the 2012 best published paper in IEEE Transactions on Power Systems award. He is associate editor of Energy Systems. Dr. Valenzuela has chaired the Energy, Natural Resources and the Environment section of INFORMS. He has served as Publication Chair at the INFORMS and the Winter Simulation conferences as well as served as Chair of the Combined Colloquia at INFORMS.

October 3rd, 2016

ISE Hosts Event for Recent Alumni

The ISE department hosted an event for recent alumni last Friday, September 30th. The event was held at Bar 23 in the Short North and over 80 people were in attendance including some faculty and current students. The event is intended to maintain connections between alumni and the department.

You can see photos of the event at ise.osu.edu/recent-photos

October 3rd, 2016

Güzin Bayraksan Awarded NSF Grant

ISE Associate Professor, Güzin Bayraksan, was recently awarded a grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) for data-driven distributionally robust stochastic programming.

Stochastic programming aids in solving difficult problems with many unknown factors. It does so by relying on probability distributions to mathematically represent and predict uncertain events. However, probabilities of possible outcomes are rarely known in real life. Distributionally robust optimization aims to obtain solutions in the presence of such distributional uncertainties. There are a variety of ways to form distributionally robust stochastic programs. However, which type of model to use for which type of data, system, or decision maker is not well understood. This award supports research to have a deeper understanding of this fundamental question and to explore multi-period uncertainties. The project considers long-term water resources management problems that take various sources of input including climate data, hydrological simulations, expert opinions, and so forth. The results, if successful, will yield improved water management, benefitting the U.S. society and economy. The research findings will be incorporated into educational materials on stochastic optimization. The project will therefore contribute to educating students. The water application will be used to demonstrate the societal impact of our field and to attract women to engineering.

October 3rd, 2016

Tenure-Track Operations Research Faculty Position at ISE

The Department of Integrated Systems Engineering (ISE) at the Ohio State University, one of the nation’s top ten public universities, invites applications for a tenure-track position in the area of operations research. (All faculty ranks will be considered.) ISE offers programs at the undergraduate, master, and doctoral levels in Industrial and Systems Engineering, which include excellent relationships with local, regional, and international industry.

The College of Engineering at the Ohio State University seeks to fill a tenure-track faculty position with an individual with outstanding expertise and demonstrated record of accomplishment in the area of operations research. This position fits the department’s long history of leadership in operations research and engineering statistics. It has a core research focus on domain-independent modeling that provides coherent solutions across a wide variety of application domains, as well as a focus on the challenges offered by specific application areas including: health care and medical applications, markets and finance, security and reliability, supply chain management, sustainability, transportation, and water and energy systems.

The successful applicant for the position will be expected to complement existing operations research strengths in the Ohio State University’s engineering and science community, working with the operations research faculty in ISE as well as faculty with expertise in engineering disciplines. Research leadership is a requirement of this appointment and the successful applicant is expected to attract significant external funding and achieve industrial partnerships. Expertise in one or more of the following areas is highly desirable:

• Large-scale optimization
• Optimization under uncertainty
• Non-linear optimization
• Dynamic optimization
• Simulation
• Analytics
• Other operations research areas

We seek a person with a demonstrated track record of leadership and collaboration in an academic and/or R&D industrial environment. Candidates must have completed or expect to soon complete a doctoral degree in engineering or in a closely related field. The successful candidate is expected to develop and sustain a strong research program by attracting sponsored research funding, disseminate research results through high-quality peer-reviewed publications, teach core undergraduate and/or graduate courses, supervise graduate student research, and provide service at the national level as well as within the university.

Interested candidates should submit a complete curriculum vitae, a separate statement of current and future research interests, a statement of teaching philosophy, and contact information for five references, electronically, to the following email address: freitas.6@osu.edu. The search committee will start reviewing new applications for this position on September 1st, 2016. The position will remain open until it is filled.

The Ohio State University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Applications from women and other underrepresented or minority groups are encouraged. Columbus is a thriving metropolitan community, and the University is responsive to the needs of dual-career couples.

October 3rd, 2016

Tenure-Track Manufacturing Faculty Position at ISE

The Department of Integrated Systems (ISE) at The Ohio State University, one of the nation’s top ten public universities, invites applications for a tenure-track position from individuals with expertise and demonstrated records of accomplishment in areas identified below, including a focus on the simulation of manufacturing processes.  Applicants should also demonstrate the background necessary to teach a broader range of courses in manufacturing processes. (All faculty ranks will be considered.) ISE offers degrees (BS, MS and Ph.D.) in Industrial and Systems Engineering.

Candidates with expertise in the simulation of manufacturing processes should demonstrate expertise in one or more of the following areas:

  • Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for structural modeling and /or composite manufacturing
  • Advanced multi-scale characterization of lightweight metals and reinforced polymer composites

Experience in experimental implementation of the manufacturing processes also is highly desirable.

A candidate hired with this expertise will be expected to play an active role in the Simulation Innovation and Modeling Center at Ohio State, providing leadership and participating in collaborative research efforts.

 We seek a person who will provide leadership and engage in collaboration. Candidates must have earned (or be about to earn) a doctoral degree in engineering or in a closely related field.  Manufacturing industry-related experience is highly desirable.  The successful candidate will be expected to develop and sustain a strong research program by attracting sponsored research funding, teach core undergraduate and/or graduate courses, supervise graduate student research and provide service at the National and State levels as well as within the University.

Interested candidates should submit a complete curriculum vitae, a separate statement of current and future research interests, a statement of teaching philosophy, and contact information for five references electronically, to the following email address: freitas.6@osu.edu.  The search committee will start reviewing new applications for this position on September 1, 2016.  The position will remain open until it is filled.

The Ohio State University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Applications from women and other underrepresented or minority groups are encouraged. Columbus is a thriving metropolitan community, and the University is responsive to the needs of dual career couples.

September 15th, 2016

ISE Welcomes Fadi Abu-Farha

Integrated Approach for the Sustainable Manufacturing of Lightweight Alloys for the Transportation Sector

Seminar by Fadi Abu-Farha

Assistant Professor – Automotive Engineering

Clemson University – International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR)

fadi@clemson.edu; (859) 489-2926

Speaker Biography:

FADI Abu-Farha as an Assistant Professor of Automotive Engineering at Clemson University’s International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR). Fadi’s prime area of research is “Lightweight Materials and their Manufacturing”; his research activities have been targeting greater utilization of lightweight materials in the transportation sector using cost-effective and energy-efficient manufacturing techniques. Particular topics of interest include: advanced material testing aided by digital image correlation (DIC) and optical metrology, sheet metal forming (characterization, constitutive modeling and FE simulations), hot stamping (HB-CD), adhesive bonding and hybrid-material joining, accumulative roll bonding and shear rolling.

Fadi received several best poster/paper/presentation awards at several events including NAMRI/SME, SAE World Congress and TMS. Fadi is a recipient of the NSF-CAREER Award, the USCAR Team Award, the SME Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award, the SAE Ralph Teetor Award, and the TMS Light Metals Division Award.

Abstract:

With the ever-growing pressure to produce “cleaner” vehicles, lightweighting is still considered one of the most effective means of reducing fuel consumption levels in the transportation sector.  The prime material candidates (such as AHSSs, aluminium and magnesium alloys) have technical “deformation & failure” issues that present major manufacturing hurdles, making it harder to implement these materials on a larger scale. To overcome this, an integrated “Mechanics-Processing-Manufacturing” approach is followed, in which we couple: (i) advanced characterization to understand and model complex material behavior, (ii) processing to alter material behavior in a favorable way, and (iii) development of new manufacturing techniques that enable forming lightweight materials. In this seminar, I present three examples of research activities in which this integration is demonstrated, in pursuit of effective, economic and sustainable lightweighting solutions. The seminar will cover: Springback prediction of advanced steels, hot blank–cold die (HB-CD) stamping of aluminium alloy sheets, and friction stir back extrusion (FSBE) of magnesium alloy tubes.

September 13th, 2016

ISE Hosts Event for Ohio-Residing Alumni

ISE alumni from various years came together at a department event at Woody’s Tavern on Friday, September 9th. The invitation was extended to all ISE alumni who are still residing in Ohio and ISE’s external advisory committee. The event was designed to network with and reconnect ISE grads to each other and the department.

An informal poster session was also presented at the event to showcase current research activities happening within the department. The posters were presented by current students, staff and faculty in ISE.

Additional photos of the event can be found here.